campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.
campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.

campbeaw:

This thing is incredible.

(via real-hiphophead)

pixelsrzen:

The Dharmachakra, symbolic of the Eightfold Path—the end to suffering.

pixelsrzen:

The Dharmachakra, symbolic of the Eightfold Path—the end to suffering.

(via black-footed)

america-wakiewakie:

Occupy abolishes $4 million in other people’s student loan debt | CNN

After forgiving millions of dollars in medical debt, Occupy Wall Street is tackling a new beast: student loans.

Marking the third anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement, the group’s Strike Debt initiative announced Wednesday it has abolished $3.8 million worth of private student loan debt since January. It said it has been buying the debts for pennies on the dollar from debt collectors, and then simply forgiving that money rather than trying to collect it.

In total, the group spent a little more than $100,000 to purchase the $3.8 million in debt.

While the group is unable to purchase the majority of the country’s $1.2 trillion in outstanding student loan debt because it is backed by the federal government, private student debt is fair game.

This debt Occupy bought belonged to 2,700 people who had taken out private student loans to attend Everest College, which is run byCorinthian Colleges. Occupy zeroed in on Everest because Corinthian Colleges is one of the country’s largest for-profit education companies and has been in serious legal hot water lately.

Following a number of federal investigations, the college told investors this summer that it plans to sell or close its 107 campuses due to financial problems — potentially leaving its 74,000 students in a lurch.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: US Uncut)

tried for punishment

i see you trying with all you have to exist as the gentle young man that you are
and i see the world punishing you for doing so
and i see you hardening
and i see you seeking warmth so as not to become brittle and crack under the pressure
and i see the world punishing you for doing so
and i see you now punishing those who are warm and trying to exist with all they have as the gentle young men and powerful young women that they are

and i see us all trying and being punished for doing so

yet we keep trying.

“I tell my students, ‘When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else. This is not just a grab-bag candy game.”
“Would whites feel comfortable living in a predominantly white community policed by an overwhelmingly black force? …Reverse the numbers and reflect; that’s all I ask.”
chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.
Samsara (2011)
chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.
Samsara (2011)
chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.
Samsara (2011)
chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.
Samsara (2011)
chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.
Samsara (2011)
chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.
Samsara (2011)

chalkandwater:

Sand mandala at Thikse Monastery, Ladakh, India.

Samsara (2011)

(via mightyjoe510)

hybridnomad:

Sara, 5 from Aleppo, Syria
"Syrian Children on the Frontline" Documentary
hybridnomad:

Sara, 5 from Aleppo, Syria
"Syrian Children on the Frontline" Documentary
hybridnomad:

Sara, 5 from Aleppo, Syria
"Syrian Children on the Frontline" Documentary
hybridnomad:

Sara, 5 from Aleppo, Syria
"Syrian Children on the Frontline" Documentary
hybridnomad:

Sara, 5 from Aleppo, Syria
"Syrian Children on the Frontline" Documentary

hybridnomad:

Sara, 5 from Aleppo, Syria

"Syrian Children on the Frontline" Documentary

(via black-footed)

Chris Hedges - Sacrificing the Vulnerable, From Gaza to America

An impoverished, captive people that lack an army, a navy, an air force, mechanized units, drones, artillery and any semblance of command and control do not pose a threat to Israel. And Israel’s indiscriminate use of modern, industrial weapons to kill hundreds of innocents, wound thousands more and make tens of thousands of families homeless is not a war. It is state-sponsored terror and state-sponsored murder.

The abject failure by our political class to acknowledge this fact, a fact that to most of the rest of the world is obvious, exposes the awful banality of our political system, the cynical abandonment of the most vulnerable of the earth for campaign contributions. Money, after all, has replaced the vote.

Makaveli & Machiavelli

Of all the rumors and conspiracy theories I’ve heard since Tupac died, only one has reverberated inside my head. “I’ve heard that Tupac isn’t really dead,” a friend said. “Why did they cremate the body right away In Las Vegas, where they had no family or friends?”

I shrugged. I make it a point never to argue down conspiracy theories.

"What I heard is that Afeni has had Tupac’s identity changed and shipped him to Cuba."

As I listened to my friend, what surprised me was how my heart leaped at the thought of Tupac alive.

That night, I had what was surely one of hundreds of dreams that people across America have had about Tupac. In the dream, I am walking down a street in Havana. The air is thick with the perfume of strong black coffee, and black men in starched white shirts play dominoes on the street. The walls are pastel pink, white, and green, the paint is peeling, the mortar is crumbling. Only the high arches in the doorways and the spiraling staircases that center the apartment buildings are indications of this city’s glorious past.

I walk down a hallway, past overcrowded apartments with no curtains because in Fidel’s Cuba, no one has anything to hide.

"Estás buscando el negro?" a woman asks me, a grandmother who I’m sure is a Fidel spy.

"Yes," I answer in pitch-perfect Spanish. "I am looking for the black guy. He’s my brother."

She points me to the last door on the floor. I make my way into a tiny studio that is decorated with orange and green crushed-velvet furniture—classy stuff if it were still 1959. Afeni is there. Tupac is there, but he looks nothing like Tupac. I know him only by his voice.

He is asking for a CD player. He wants some rap CDs. His mother explains that such music will give him way. She prompts him to listen to his Spanish tapes; he may never go home, so he must learn the language. She directs him to a large stack of books—books about Che Guevara, about Fidel, about Latin-American history. She tells him that his life has been saved for only one purpose—to aid the revolution he was born into.

"Y’all don’t give a nigga much of a choice," he says, looking around the tiny room and smiling at the woman who has loved him better and more wisely than he ever loved himself. He goes over to the window and looks out, thinking, as he always does, that if he stares hard enough, he can see past the calles of Cuba to his beloved ‘hood, where on the corner, someone is playing Cee-Lo and someone is smoking crack and someone is playing a Tupac song and someone is laughing and someone is crying. But he can’t see any of it, not really. And as each day goes by, it’s that much harder to conjure the ‘hood in his mind. He sits down, puts his feet up on the table, opens a book, and begins to read.

by  Veronica Chambers

From Esquire (December, 1996)

whoiskdot:

nassays:

You ready? On Thurs, October 2nd in over 40 cities across America, Nas: Time is Illmatic is coming to you!! Get your tickets NOW before they sell out!! http://tribecafilm.com/nas

buddhag colinresponse mightyjoe510 it’s screening at the new parkway in Oakland

What is the difference between a poorly-dressed man on a bicycle and a well-dressed man on a tricycle?