Pandora Chain

You can tell a lot about someone by the music they listen to. Hit shuffle in your iPod/iPhone/iTunes/media player and write down the first 10 songs. Then pass this on to 10 people.
I was tagged by buddhag and eyadesigns.

1. Bob Marley & The Wailers - Corner Stone
2. Arundhati Roy - Caste & Class (Speech)
3. Slum Village - Look of Love (Prod. J-Dilla)
4. Andre3000 - Funkin Around
5. Big K.R.I.T. - Wakeup Saxaphone by Willie B
6. Thundercat - Message For Austin / Praise the Lord / Enter the Void
7. Senbei feat. Memphis Reigns, Paris Warr & Blooms - The Bay (‘11 til Infinity Remix)
8. Blu & Ta’Rach - Love Don’t
9. Kendrick Lamar - ADHD
10. J-Dilla - Hi

Surprised (and a lil disappointed) that Little Dragon, M.I.A., The Seshen and/or A Tribe Called Red didnt pop up!

papershopprojects:

The University of Hawai’i Press will be having a 67% off sale from September 5 (6am) to September 8 (6am), Hawai’i Standard Time!

They have a small selection of Okinawa/Ryukyu-related books including the Okinawan-English Wordbook (Mitsugu Sakihara), Okinawan Diaspora (edited by Ronald Nakasone), and Voices from Okinawa: Featuring Three Plays by Jon Shirota.

Jim & Jap Crow: A History of 1940s Japanese American Internment & Interracial America

Author Matthew Briones and Cornel West discuss the causes, effects, similarities and differences between the treatment of Japanese and African Americans during WWII.

labor day(s)

i’m being forced to rethink everything i thought i knew about teaching and teachers as a whole. i just spent the last 6 hours of my “day off” entering grades and still need to plan for the week/s ahead. kevin kumashiro talks about the ways we blame teachers as individuals for educational disparities, distorts the big picture of oppressive institutional systems that set up teachers (especially those who work in working-class of color communities) to burn out, and generally not operate at peak potential for the young people in front of them. In the Richmond/WCCUSD I definitely had some traumatic “Educational” experiences, but at the same time, I’m truly humbled right now in thinking back on all the “bad” teachers I had. Considering our district went bankrupt and almost closed (all) it’s doors, it’s amazing any learning happened at all most days. And at the same time I have far too many friends and acquaintences who are now literally incarcerted, or figuratively so, in various and varying addictions—says the whiskey-loving, online-shopping-ass, tumblr-fiend—due to a lack of ever feeling connected to a liberating/humanizing curriculum and education. What happened back then and continues to happen is by all means criminal and will never for a solitary moment, be justified in any way.

Right now I’m so incredibly lucky to be where I’m at and am so grateful to be learning through this sometimes painful process. …and most importantly, to not be doing so in isolation. Loving my partner, fam, team, crew/homies, community, etc. dumbass hard right now and forever, for having my back in crazyass ways. I aint doodoo without yall. One foot in front of the other…

CLICK LINK TO REGISTER. 

October 11, 2014. Mission High School, San Francisco, CA. 

exgynocraticgrrl:

Suheir Hammad: Not Your Erotic, Not Your Exotic

Don’t wanna’ be your exotic/Like some dark, fragile, colorful bird imprisoned, caged in a land foreign to the stretch of her wings/Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Women everywhere look just like me/Some taller, darker, nice than me but like me just the same/Women everywhere carry my nose on their faces/My name on their spirits.
Don’t seduce yourself with my other-ness/My hair wasn’t put on top my head to entice you into some mysterious, black voodoo/The beat of my lashes against each other ain’t some dark, desert beat/It’s just a blink/Get over it.
Don’t build around me your fetish, fantasy, your lustful profanity to cage me in, clip my wings. Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Your lovin’ of my beauty ain’t more than funky fornication, plain pink perversion. In fact, nasty necrophilia.
Because my beauty is dead to you/I am dead to you.
Not your harem girl, geisha doll, banana picker, pom-pom girl, pum-pum shorts coffee maker, town-whore, belly dancer, private dancer, La Malinche, Venus Hottentot, laundry girl, your immaculate vessel, emasculating princess/Don’t wanna’ be - not your erotic, not your exotic.

Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet, author and political activist who was born on October 1973 in Amman, Jordan to Palestinian refugee parents and immigrated with her family to Brooklyn, New York City when she was five years old. Her parents later moved to Staten Island. (x)
exgynocraticgrrl:

Suheir Hammad: Not Your Erotic, Not Your Exotic

Don’t wanna’ be your exotic/Like some dark, fragile, colorful bird imprisoned, caged in a land foreign to the stretch of her wings/Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Women everywhere look just like me/Some taller, darker, nice than me but like me just the same/Women everywhere carry my nose on their faces/My name on their spirits.
Don’t seduce yourself with my other-ness/My hair wasn’t put on top my head to entice you into some mysterious, black voodoo/The beat of my lashes against each other ain’t some dark, desert beat/It’s just a blink/Get over it.
Don’t build around me your fetish, fantasy, your lustful profanity to cage me in, clip my wings. Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Your lovin’ of my beauty ain’t more than funky fornication, plain pink perversion. In fact, nasty necrophilia.
Because my beauty is dead to you/I am dead to you.
Not your harem girl, geisha doll, banana picker, pom-pom girl, pum-pum shorts coffee maker, town-whore, belly dancer, private dancer, La Malinche, Venus Hottentot, laundry girl, your immaculate vessel, emasculating princess/Don’t wanna’ be - not your erotic, not your exotic.

Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet, author and political activist who was born on October 1973 in Amman, Jordan to Palestinian refugee parents and immigrated with her family to Brooklyn, New York City when she was five years old. Her parents later moved to Staten Island. (x)
exgynocraticgrrl:

Suheir Hammad: Not Your Erotic, Not Your Exotic

Don’t wanna’ be your exotic/Like some dark, fragile, colorful bird imprisoned, caged in a land foreign to the stretch of her wings/Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Women everywhere look just like me/Some taller, darker, nice than me but like me just the same/Women everywhere carry my nose on their faces/My name on their spirits.
Don’t seduce yourself with my other-ness/My hair wasn’t put on top my head to entice you into some mysterious, black voodoo/The beat of my lashes against each other ain’t some dark, desert beat/It’s just a blink/Get over it.
Don’t build around me your fetish, fantasy, your lustful profanity to cage me in, clip my wings. Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Your lovin’ of my beauty ain’t more than funky fornication, plain pink perversion. In fact, nasty necrophilia.
Because my beauty is dead to you/I am dead to you.
Not your harem girl, geisha doll, banana picker, pom-pom girl, pum-pum shorts coffee maker, town-whore, belly dancer, private dancer, La Malinche, Venus Hottentot, laundry girl, your immaculate vessel, emasculating princess/Don’t wanna’ be - not your erotic, not your exotic.

Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet, author and political activist who was born on October 1973 in Amman, Jordan to Palestinian refugee parents and immigrated with her family to Brooklyn, New York City when she was five years old. Her parents later moved to Staten Island. (x)

exgynocraticgrrl:

Suheir Hammad: Not Your Erotic, Not Your Exotic

Don’t wanna’ be your exotic/Like some dark, fragile, colorful bird imprisoned, caged in a land foreign to the stretch of her wings/Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Women everywhere look just like me/Some taller, darker, nice than me but like me just the same/Women everywhere carry my nose on their faces/My name on their spirits.

Don’t seduce yourself with my other-ness/My hair wasn’t put on top my head to entice you into some mysterious, black voodoo/The beat of my lashes against each other ain’t some dark, desert beat/It’s just a blink/Get over it.

Don’t build around me your fetish, fantasy, your lustful profanity to cage me in, clip my wings. Don’t wanna’ be your exotic. Your lovin’ of my beauty ain’t more than funky fornication, plain pink perversion. In fact, nasty necrophilia.

Because my beauty is dead to you/I am dead to you.

Not your harem girl, geisha doll, banana picker, pom-pom girl, pum-pum shorts coffee maker, town-whore, belly dancer, private dancer, La Malinche, Venus Hottentot, laundry girl, your immaculate vessel, emasculating princess/Don’t wanna’ be - not your erotic, not your exotic.


Suheir Hammad is a Palestinian-American poet, author and political activist who was born on October 1973 in Amman, Jordan to Palestinian refugee parents and immigrated with her family to Brooklyn, New York City when she was five years old. Her parents later moved to Staten Island. (x)

(via trinidadescobar)


First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.
Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.
Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.
Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.
Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

First pages of Asian Women (1971), a journal produced by students at UC Berkeley, with articles and art submitted by Asian women across the country.

Most of the compilers met in Asian Studies 170, a winter 1971 proseminar designed to discuss the history and roles of Asian women. Confronted with sexism in the Asian movement, and finding that “the white middle-class woman’s liberation movement” was not relevant to their lives, many Asian American women activists in colleges found the need to create venues for their experiences and opinions.

(via trinidadescobar)